Important News for Homeowners with Furnaces Manufactured Before 2001

 

More than 49 brands of furnaces produced prior to 2001 may possess potentially defective parts. Thousands of these furnaces may still be in homes today. Should these furnaces components fail, they present some possible risk to homeowners.

Potentially defective furnace parts were distributed to the public.

Consolidated Industries, one of the largest manufactures of HVAC equipment, built these furnace components. They supplied these components to leading HVAC companies in the industry who used them to manufacture residential furnaces.

Multiple reports of problems have surfaced.

In California, the furnaces contain NOx rods that could cause the burners to overheat and ignite a fire. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) received 50 reports of fires associated with 140,000 furnaces.

Later, these furnaces were found to have potentially defective burners, heat exchangers, and/or expansion joints. Should one of these critical parts fail, they pose a serious risk of fire and/or carbon monoxide.

Legal action has been taken against Consolidated Industries.

In 2002, due to the defective NOx rods, Consolidated Industries settled a class action lawsuit with California homeowners: Salah v. Consolidated Industries, Inc., Santa Clara County Superior Court, for the State of California, Case No. CV738376.

In 2009, due to the defective burners, heat exchangers, and/or expansion joints, Consolidated Industries bankruptcy estate settled a nationwide private class action lawsuite: Stefanyshyn v. Consolidated Industries, Inc., Tippecanoe County Superior Court, for the State of Indiana, Case No. 79D 01-9712-CT-59.

Get your furnace evaluated now to prevent potential hazards.

We want you to stay safe in your home. So make sure you contact a Gilmore professional to get your furnace inspected as soon as possible. We can easily identify Consolidated Industries furnaces and parts, and recommend a solution that will work more safely and efficiently for you.

Furnace Care

As summer turns to fall, inevitably the day comes where it’s time to switch your thermostat from ‘cool’ to ‘heat,’ and bring your furnace to life. But how well your furnace performs depends on how well it’s maintained, because even a new furnace loses efficiency after just one year.

The combustion chamber is a common source of lost efficiency.

Lost efficiency begins in the combustion chamber. Soot buildup can corrode chamber walls; cleaning it out boosts performance. Before replacing the cover, it’s important to inspect for holes and corrosion.

Damage to the heat exchanger can affect performance and safety.

The heat exchanger should be carefully inspected by a professional, because a cracked exchanger can potentially increase carbon monoxide levels, which can pose a danger to a home’s occupants. That’s why testing combustion ensures not just performance, but safety as well. Gases are measured in the exhaust flue, checking for proper fuel and air balance.

Burners and ignitors should be checked carefully.

The burner may need adjustment. The burner flame’s color and shape at the ignitor are the best indication of complete and stable combustion.

In gas furnaces, ignitor tubes are typically vacuumed clean as part of an annual checkup. Your system’s exhaust flue pipe also needs careful inspection for holes that could allow carbon monoxide leaks. While smaller holes can be patched, a corroded flue pipe should be replaced.

Finally, there are some steps homeowners can take to help their systems breathe easier.

Check and replace air filters regularly. Be sure to use the right size. Pleated ones work best. You should also annually remove and clean registers, and vacuum floor ducts. Lost efficiency means increased energy bills. That’s why annual maintenance helps keep your home warm and your system efficient.